National Water Model Data Explorer app

The National Water Model Data Explorer app was created to allow users to explore and download the National Water Model data being stored on the HydroShare Apps server. This can be done both from within this app or externally through the developer’s API.

What can I do with this App?

With this app you can explore and download the latest National Water Model data, including short, medium, and long range forecasts for many parameters relating to channels, reservoirs, land, and terrain across the United States of America.

App Output

If exploring the National Water Model data through the graphical user interface (GUI), then the contents of each explorable “directory” show up in a separate drop-down list. If a file is selected from the dropdown list, some generic metadata corresponding to the file will appear (date created, date last modified, size, and owner) along with a “Download” button. If the download button is clicked, the download will begin in the user’s browser in whatever format was indicated by the selected file’s extension. These are most often netCDF files (“.nc”).
If accessing data through the API, all API responses come back in JSON format, except when using the API to download a file. In that case, a streaming download of the file content is returned.

Example Uses of App

Let’s say that you are a water scientist who has developed a robust hydrologic model for predicting streamflow over a short range period of a few days. Now you would like to compare your model to the National Water Model. With the NWM Data Explorer app, you can obtain both the forcings that were used as inputs to the the National Water Model, as well as the forecasts that were produced with those inputs. Here is what you would do:

To get the forcing files (NWM inputs):

  1. Go to the Filesystem Explorer page (https://apps.hydroshare.org/apps/nwm-data-explorer/files_explorer/)
  2. Expand the “Filter Options” by clicking the red link with that name
  3. Under “Show hours of forecast initialization”, click in the input box
  4. Select “0” from the dropdown.
  5. Click “Apply Filters”
  6. Close the “Filter Options” by clicking the red link with that name again
  7. Click the dropdown input that contains the placeholder text: “Select a file/folder”
  8. Select “fe_short_range”
    1. Another dropdown input will appear
  9. Click this new dropdown input that contains the placeholder text: “Select a file/folder”
  10. Scroll to the bottom and select the directory with the latest date (YYYYMMDD format)
    1. Another dropdown will appear
    2. A “Download All” button will appear
  11. Click the “Download All” button to download all of the forcing files for that date that were initialized at 12:00AM (hour “0”). Several files will begin downloading in your browser.

To get the NWM streamflow forecasts (NWM outputs):

  1. Go to the Filesystem Explorer page (https://apps.hydroshare.org/apps/nwm-data-explorer/files_explorer/)
  2. Expand the “Filter Options” by clicking the red link with that name
  3. Under “Show forecast file geometries:” click in the input box
  4. Select “channel_rt” from the dropdown
  5. Under “Show hours of forecast initialization:”, click in the input box
  6. Select “0” from the dropdown.
  7. Click “Apply Filters”
  8. Close the “Filter Options” by clicking the red link with that name again
  9. Click the dropdown input that contains the placeholder text: “Select a file/folder”
  10. Select “fe_short_range”
    1. Another dropdown input will appear
  11. Click this new dropdown input that contains the placeholder text: “Select a file/folder”
  12. Scroll to the bottom and select the directory with the latest date (YYYYMMDD format)
    1. Another dropdown will appear
    2. A “Download All” button will appear
  13. Click the “Download All” button to download all of the streamflow prediction files (“channel_rt”)  for that date that were initialized at 12:00AM (hour “0”).

Suggestions to learn more

Credits, Authors, Contributors and Contacts

This app was created by Shawn Crawley at the Hydroinfomatics Lab at Brigham Young University under the direction of Jim Nelson and Dan Ames. Christian Kesler and Michael Souffrant also contributed in planning discussion and the development of similar apps in conjunction with the National Water Model.